Vaccinations

 

 

Why can’t vaccinations be given without a current physical?

 

Prior to administering any vaccination, we want to establish that your pet is healthy. A sick animal will be further stressed when exposed to a vaccination (an injection which is intended to generate an immune response). This increased stress often makes the animal more sick, causing discomfort and sometimes life-threatening complications. Animals that are not healthy may not mount effective immune responses to the vaccinations, diminishing the value of the vaccines. This is especially important for rabies vaccination, as the first vaccination is typically not followed by a booster shot for one year.

Additionally, when using rabies vaccinations that are licensed for three years, declining immunity over time can render your pet (and your family, since unvaccinated pets can expose people to rabies) unprotected near the end of the vaccination period. Often, a thorough physical exam allows us to detect health problems before they become threatening to the health and comfort of your pet. We can find (and treat) disease such as: dental disease, including tooth decay, gingivitis, and tarter buildup, benign and malignant cancers, including mammary tumors, skin masses, and abdominal tumors, ear infections and heart disease. Early detection is the key to successfully treating and/or curing many of these ailments.

VeterinarySpecialistReferrals        Canine Vaccine Protocol

Rabies: The 1st vaccination is given after 12 weeks or age or older and is boostered in one year, then every 3 years.

Da2PPV: The first vaccination is given after 6-8 weeks of age, then boostered every 3-4 weeks through 16 weeks of age. A single dose is given 1 year following the last dose of the initial series, and then every 3 years.

PARVO: The 1st vaccination is given after 20 weeks of age to breeds with a higher incidence of this disease, then yearly.

Bordetella: The 1st intranasal vaccination may be given as early as 3 weeks, then yearly (or every 6 months for higher risk dogs).

Leptospirosis: The 1st vaccination is given after 12 weeks of age and boostered in 3-4 weeks, then yearly.

Vaccine Reactions:  Some cdogs may experience a vaccine reaction.  Symptoms may include lethargy, vomiting or face swelling and typically will occur within a few hours after the vaccine has been given.  In the event your dog does have a vaccine reaction, please call usimmediately so we can properly treat your dog.

        Feline Vaccine Protocol

Rabies: The 1st vaccination is given after 12 weeks or age or older and is boostered in one year. We use non-adjuvaned rabies vaccinations in cats which should be administered yearly.

FVRCP: The first vaccination is given after 6-8 weeks of age, then boostered every 3-4 weeks through 16 weeks of age. A single dose is given 1 year following the last dose of the initial series, and then every 3 years.

FeLV: The 1st vaccination is given after 8-10 weeks of age, then boostered in 3-4 weeks, then annually.

Vaccine Reactions:  Some cats may experience a vaccine reaction.  Symptoms may include lethargy, vomiting or face swelling and typically will occur within a few hours after the vaccine has been given.  In the event your cat does have a vaccine reaction, please call usimmediately so we can properly treat your cat.

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Phone: 206.285.7387

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